V-Tech: Chain of Reactions

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  • V-Tech: Chain of Reactions

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Title

V-Tech: Chain of Reactions

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<b>Artist&#39;s Comments</b>

We were supposed to do a project either showing ourselves perceptually or in response to the Virginia Tech shootings. Since I already have a self-portrait for pretty much every year of my life, I decided to do the latter.

After watching the Cho footage and some other student-captured footage on YouTube, I tried to think of the different reactions people might have and sketched out a rough group of people. I ended up adding some more words later. I also added some newspaper clippings related to the shootings.

The puzzle pieces represent a concept I was thinking about. Originally I had come up with "Nobody wants to have a view of the world with pieces that are missing, just like no one is satisfied with a puzzle that can&#39;t be completed" in regards to the importance of protecting endangered species, but it works here too... think about all the families and friends that lost someone close to them in the blink of an eye. Now there are empty spaces in their lives where those people should have been, but now aren&#39;t because of this... Yeah, cheesey, but I like my analogy.

I threw in some silver you can&#39;t see for all the black. All the eyes are either orange or maroon (the school&#39;s colors) as well as a few of the puzzle pieces.

I admit I rushed, but the teacher liked it, but then this one student who likes to give me (and only me, apparently) constructive criticism all the time said the two figures on the left were the same height and took away from the rest of the drawing, and that they should be cropped out. I&#39;ve looked at it and I -guess- I see what he means, but I like the composition like it is, honestly, and the girl about to pray (who reminds me of Kraehe from Princess Tutu) is one of my favorites), so... O_o And then everyone got into a big discussion over whether it took away from it or not and I just sat there and muttered "wow, we&#39;re arguing". Seriously... I think maybe he thinks I think too highly of my own work because the teacher praises me all the time (I really haven&#39;t liked much of the work I did in class at all, and always try to criticise myself - which doesn&#39;t work cuz Richard&#39;s always like "WTC?"). I liked Lindsay&#39;s and Scott&#39;s pieces. I really liked Lindsay&#39;s, it was way neat.

Anyway, sorry for the IRL rant. =P

Time: ...er... maybe 3.5 hours? I dunno. Not long in all honesty

Materials: black and silver sharpies, markers, pencil (for sketch), newspaper clippings, charcoal, conte crayon (I actually sprayed this to seal; go me)

About license: You may use this for noncommercial uses if you want, like if you were doing a video montage tribute to Virginia Tech or something. Just please 1) credit me and 2) do not change this image. None of my work should be used for any purpose unless it is stated that you can.

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Original submitted to deviantart.com on April 30, 2007: <a href="http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/54344293/">http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/54344293/</a>

Licensed under a <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.5/">
Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 License</a>.

Creator

ellana

Source

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Date

2007-05-24

Contributor

Brent Jesiek

Rights

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5

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Language

eng

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Citation

ellana, "V-Tech: Chain of Reactions," in The April 16 Archive, Item #220, http://www.april16archive.org/items/show/220 (accessed August 30, 2014).